Association of Changes in Effusion-Synovitis and Progression of Cartilage Damage Over 18 Months in Patients with Osteoarthritis (OA) and Meniscal Tear

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SCIENCE
Association of Changes in Effusion-Synovitis and Progression of Cartilage Damage Over 18 Months in Patients with Osteoarthritis (OA) and Meniscal Tear
Key Take-Away: 

As per the American College of Rheumatology, in patients with OA and meniscal tear, the presence or persistence of effusion-synovitis can be connected with the progression of cartilage damage. This study portrayed that persistently extensive effusion-synovitis had a statistically significant increased risk of cartilage damage depth progression than those with persistently minimal effusion-synovitis.

Introduction:

Synovitis is a characteristic of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and meniscal tear. It has been concerned with articular cartilage damage. This study investigated the associations between baseline and changes in effusion-synovitis and cartilage damage in a cohort with OA and meniscal tear.

 

Method:

The data was analysed from the Meniscal Tear in Osteoarthritis Research (MeTeOR) trial of surgery vs physical therapy for the treatment of meniscal tear. Semiquantitative grading of effusion-synovitis and cartilage damage on MRI and dichotomized effusion-synovitis as none/small ('minimal') and medium/large ('extensive') grading was executed. The association between baseline and changes in effusion-synovitis on changes in cartilage damage size and depth over 18 months, using Poisson regression models was assessed. Analyses were adjusted for demographics, treatment, and baseline cartilage damage.

 

Results:

Overall 221 participants were analysed, over 18 months, effusion-synovitis was persistently minimal in 45.3% and persistently extensive in 21.3%. The remaining 33.5% had minimal synovitis on one occasion and extensive on the other. In adjusted analyses, extensive effusion-synovitis at baseline was associated with a relative risk (RR) of 1.7 (95% CI 1.1, 2.6) for the progression of cartilage damage depth. Compared to those with persistently minimal effusion-synovitis, persistently extensive effusion-synovitis had a statistically significant increased risk of progression of cartilage damage depth (RR 2.0 95% CI 1.1, 3.4).

 

Conclusions:

The presence of extensive effusion-synovitis found to be associated with subsequent progression of cartilage damage over 18 months. Persistence of extensive effusion-synovitis over time was associated with the most significant risk of concurrent cartilage damage progression.

Source

Arthritis Rheumatol

Link:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30133187

Original title of article:

Association of Changes in Effusion-Synovitis and Progression of Cartilage Damage Over 18 Months in Patients with Osteoarthritis and Meniscal Tear

Authors:

Molund M et al.

Exploratory, Osteoarthritis, Cartilage, Meniscus, Poisson regression models
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