Serum Lipid Profile and Risk of Hand Osteoarthritis

Primary tabs

NEWS
Serum Lipid Profile and Risk of Hand Osteoarthritis

Higher levels of HDL cholesterol were found to be linked with the decreased risk of hand osteoarthritis (RHOA) over 11 years of follow-up, confirms a recent study.

Hand osteoarthritis is characterized by pain, weakness and stiffness of the hand which impairs the quality of life of the person suffering from it. Hyperlipidemia could be one of the factors associated with the development of hand osteoarthritis (HOA). Till now, no longitudinal studies have estimated the relationship between serum lipid profile and RHOA. To cater this area of great unmet need, the present study was conducted.

This prospective population-based cohort study included all women from the Chingford study with available baseline lipid measurements and without RHOA on the baseline. The principal outcome of the study was the occurrence of RHOA over 11 years of follow-up. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to find the relationship between serum lipid profile and RHOA.

The overall incidence of RHOA was found to be 51.6%. An inverse relationship between HDL cholesterol levels and the frequency of RHOA was observed. A significant trend was noted in the triglycerides levels.  No association was observed with total or LDL cholesterol while the increased levels of HDL cholesterol were found to be associated with lower RHOA after 11 years of follow-up.

Further extensive research needs to be carried out to have a better understanding of HOA risk factors, mechanisms related to the lipid pathway, and the efficacy of lipid-lowering therapy on decreasing the prevalence of OA.

Source:

Scientific Reports

Link to the source:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-03317-4

The original title of the article:

Serum Lipid Levels and Risk Of Hand Osteoarthritis: The Chingford Prospective Cohort Study.

Authors

Smith D, Wilkie R et al.

SearchTags: 
Diagnostic, Hand osteoarthritis, Hand, Wrist, Fingers, Prospective population-based cohort study
Log in or register to post comments