Rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs have lower period prevalence for most common comorbidities

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Rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs have lower period prevalence for most common comorbidities

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a persistent inflammatory disease. Although anyone can be a victim of RA, it is more commmon in women and population living fifth to sixth decade of their life. With more intensive therapies like the biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs), symptoms and prognosis of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has also ameliorated. The real life data related to prevalannce of comorbidities among patients treated or not treated with bDMARDs is insufficient.

The current study was aimed to assess  the differences in comorbidity and health care consumption in RA patients, with and without bDMARDs. This cross-sectional study was executed in the Southwestern part of Sweden, during 2009-2010. Patients aged ≥ 18 years and diagnosed with RA in secondary health care were included in the study.  Between 2006 and 2010, aggregated data of comorbidity and health care consumption were recovered. On 31st December 2010, RA patients treated with bDMARDs were identified in the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register (SRQ), which comprised the biologics register Anti-Rheumatic Therapy in Sweden (ARTIS). To pinpoint the factors related to bDMARDs, descriptive, comparative, univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were used.

A total of 7712 RA patients were identified (age 64.8 ± 14.9 years, women 74.3%), of whom 1137 (14.7%) were treated with bDMARDs. The most common comorbidities were infections (69.2%), hypertension (41.1%), chronic respiratory disease (15.3%), ischemic heart disease (14.0%) and malignancy (13.7%). Older patients with more comorbidity were without  bDMARDs. In multiple logistic regression analysis, older age, cerebrovascular and chronic respiratory disease, heart failure, depression and malignancy were all related to no present bDMARDs. Infections were concerned with bDMARDs. Patients treated with bDMARDs consumed more secondary outpatient care, but less visits in primary health care compared to patients without bDMARDs. Patients treated with bDMARDs consumed more secondary outpatient care, but with less visits in primary health care as distinguished from patients without bDMARDs.

The patients treated with bDMARDs versus no bDMARDs were younger and had notably lower period prevalence for most common comorbidities, with the exception of infections. In ordinary care, differences in comorbidities between RA patients with or without bDMARDs should be taken into consideration when assessing efficacy and safety of bDMARDs.

Source:

BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

Link to the source:

http://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12891-016-1354-7

Original title of article:

Comparisons between comorbid conditions and health care consumption in rheumatoid arthritis patients with or without biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs: a register-based study

Authors:

 Karin Bengtsson et al.

BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
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