Radiofrequency neurotomy vs intra-articular for knee osteoarthritis

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Radiofrequency neurotomy vs intra-articular for knee osteoarthritis

Chronic knee osteoarthritis is the deterioration of articular cartilage and is one of the most common disease at time of aging. Millions of people have been diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis. It results in pain, functional disability, restricted movements and sleep disturbances.

In patients, who have failed traditional therapies, radiofrequency neurotomy might be a successful alternative treatment with low risk of complications. Recently, a study was conducted in this context to compare the efficacy of intra-articular injection and radiofrequency (RF) neurotomy of genicular nerves in patients with chronic knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain and results of the study were recently published in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

According to Sinem Sari, M.D., from Adnan Menderes University in Aydin, Turkey, and his colleagues, enrolled 73 patients with chronic knee OA pain and compared the efficacy of intra-articular injection and RF neurotomy of genicular nerves. Patients were randomized to Group IA (intra-articular 2.5 mL of bupivacaine, 2.5 mg of morphine, and 1 mL of betamethasone) or Group RF (RF neurotomy of the genicular nerves).

Results did not reveal any statistically significant difference between the two groups in baseline visual analogue scale (VAS) pain. Group RF had significant reductions in VAS pain in the first and third month (P < .001). A significant reduction was seen in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index of Osteoarthritis total scores in the first month in Group RF versus Group IA (P < .001).

"This treatment modality may be recommended as a beneficial treatment option in inoperable patients with comorbidities or patients unresponsive to conservative treatment," the authors wrote.

Rheumatology Advisor
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