Meniscal injuries in children and adolescents undergoing surgical treatment for tibial eminence fractures

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Meniscal injuries in children and adolescents undergoing surgical treatment for tibial eminence fractures
Key Take-Away: 

The rate of meniscal injuries increases in the children with increasing age and sexual maturity. Here, magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic approach has been depicted to portray their role in its diagnosis and management.

To prospectively evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of meniscal injuries in children and adolescents undergoing surgical treatment for tibial eminence fractures and to test for possible relationships between associated meniscal lesions and patient demographics or injury characteristics.

ABSTRACT: 
Background: 

To prospectively evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of meniscal injuries in children and adolescents undergoing surgical treatment for tibial eminence fractures and to test for possible re

To prospectively evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of meniscal injuries in children and adolescents undergoing surgical treatment for tibial eminence fractures and to test for possible relationships between associated meniscal lesions and patient demographics or injury characteristics.

Methods: 

A prospective multicenter study was conducted to arthroscopically assess the prevalence and characteristics of meniscal injuries in children and adolescents undergoing surgical treatment for tibial eminence fractures between 04/2014 and 10/2015.

Patient demographics and injury characteristics were assessed preoperatively. The presence of a meniscal injury was evaluated arthroscopically and characterized according to tear type and location (Cooper classification). Patients with and without meniscal injuries were compared with regard to sex, age, height, weight, BMI, type of injury, mechanism of injury, time to surgery, Tanner stage, sexual maturity (prepubescent vs. pubescent), and modified Meyers and McKeever classification.

Results: 

A total of 54 consecutive patients (65 % males, mean age: 12.5 ± 3.2 years) were enrolled. Meniscal injury was found in 20 patients (37 %). The lateral meniscus was involved in 18 patients (90 % of all meniscus injuries) and the medial meniscus in 2 patients (10 % of all meniscus injuries).

The most common tear pattern was a longitudinal tear of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus (30 % of all meniscus injuries) and the second most common tear was a root detachment of the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus (20 % of all meniscus injuries). Higher age, advanced Tanner stage, and pubescence were significantly associated with an accompanying meniscal injury.

Conclusion: 

Meniscal injuries in children and adolescents undergoing surgical treatment for tibial eminence fractures must be expected in almost 40 %, with a higher prevalence with increasing age and sexual maturity.

With regard to the clinical relevance, the results of the present study argue in favor for magnetic resonance imaging prior to surgery in every patient with a suspected tibial eminence fracture and for an arthroscopic approach to adequately diagnose and treat meniscal injuries.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2016 May 27
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