The impact of daily yoga-based exercise on pain, pain interference, sleep and stress in patients with fibromyalgia

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The impact of daily yoga-based exercise on pain, pain interference, sleep and stress in patients with fibromyalgia
Key Take-Away: 

Conventional pharmacological therapies are unproductive for management of pain stress and sleep disturbances associated with fibromyalgia. Yoga-based exercises significantly reduced incidences of pain, anxiety and sleep disorders measures at 2nd and 6th week of treatment among fibromyalgia patients.

Chronic widespread pain experienced by patients with Fibromyalgia is notably resistant to treatment with conventional pharmacological therapies, and is often accompanied by higher reported stress and sleep disturbances. 

ABSTRACT: 
Background: 

Chronic widespread pain experienced by patients with Fibromyalgia is notably resistant to treatment with conventional pharmacological therapies, and is often accompanied by higher reported stress and sleep disturbances.

Previous studies have reported the benefits of regular exercise to patients with a variety of chronic pain conditions. However, patients with fibromyalgia are often resistant to intense exercise, which may worsen pain. Yoga is a relatively gentle and individually adaptable form of exercise, which may modulate stress and improve sleep. Also, wide variations in patient characteristics can make randomized controlled studies difficult to perform in this population.

Methods: 

In this longitudinal study, women with fibromyalgia (Wolfe 2011 criteria) and at least a moderate degree of sleep disturbance (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index>5) were recruited.

Patients attended weekly yoga sessions and practiced 30 min of daily yoga with videos sent electronically, and simultaneously recorded twice-daily diaries during a baseline week, week 2 and week 6 of yoga, including measures of pain, stress, and sleep quality.

Results: 

Paired sample t-test revealed significant decrease on average and worst pain ratings during the 2nd and 6th week of daily gentle yoga, compared to baseline as well as a decrease in reported fatigue at 6 weeks after starting the program (p<0.5).

Those practicing more frequently reported greater improvements in pain scores at 2 weeks.

Conclusion: 

Although there were no adverse events or side effects reported by participants, there was some heterogeneity of treatment response.

Fatigue, stress, and pain ratings were highly inter-correlated amongst participants. Future studies might be able to determine the interdependence of these symptoms on the impact of yoga-based exercise in fibromyalgia patients.

Source:

The Journal of Pain

Link to the source:

http://www.jpain.org/article/S1526-5900(17)30242-0/fulltext?rss=yes

The original title of the article:

The impact of daily yoga-based exercise on pain, pain interference, sleep and stress in patients with fibromyalgia: A pilot study

Authors:

 A. Lazaridou et al.

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