Higher Levels of Certain Oral Microbes Correlated With Migraines

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Higher Levels of Certain Oral Microbes Correlated With Migraines

It is well known that nitrates is the triggering factor for migraine pain. According to Antonio Gonzalez, first author, a programmer analyst in the laboratory of Rob Knight, PhD, professor and director of the Center for Microbiome Innovation at UC San Diego, "There is this idea out there that certain foods trigger migraines such as chocolate, wine and especially foods containing nitrates." He added,"We thought that perhaps there are connections between what people are eating, their microbiomes and their experiences with migraines."

Nitrates are found in processed meats, green leafy vegetables and in many medicines, can be converted to nitrites by bacteria found in the oral cavity.  These Nitrates are broken down by certain types of bacteria. They are eventually turned into nitric oxide in the bloodstream under certain conditions, as it aids cardiovascular health by improving blood flow and reducing blood pressure.  This research suggests migraine sufferers have higher levels of these bacteria in their oral cavity and therefore higher levels of nitric oxide.

In this study, a team of researchers, Gonzalez and colleague Embriette Hyde, PhD, analyzed the data from American Gut Project. This database included 172 oral  samples and 1996 fecal samples from healthy participants. Gene sequencing to screen bacterial species found different abundances between migraineurs and non-migraineurs. But, the authors found no differences in samples from people with migraines vs those without migraine. Next, the researchers used an innovative bioinformatic tool called PICRUSt to analyze which genes were likely to be present in the two different sets of samples, given the bacterial species present. In fecal samples, they found “small but significant differences” in abundance of these genes between the two groups in fecal samples and found them to be “significantly” more abundant in oral samples in people who reported migraines than did non-migrainuers.

The study authors concluded, that there is a potential association between bacterial nitrate, nitrite, and nitric oxide reducers and migraines, by reporting their higher abundances in the oral cavities of people with. Future studies should examine on  characterizing the connection between oral bacterial nitrate, nitrite, and nitric oxide reducers and migraines.

Source:

University of California San Diego Health Sciences

Link to the source:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161018132608.htm

Original title of article:

Higher Levels of Certain Oral Microbes Correlated With Migraines

Authors:

Antonio Gonzalez,  Embriette Hyde

University of California San Diego Health Sciences
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