Fibromyalgia as a marker for seizures

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Fibromyalgia as a marker for seizures

Researchers believed that there is a relation between fibromyalgia and seizures. Various clinical trials have also been performed to find out the relation between fibromyalgia and seizures. Recently a case-matched study was also performed to determine how frequently fibromyalgia is associated with different paroxysmal neurological disorders.

The utility of fibromyalgia as a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures was also explored during the study.

In a neurology clinic, the billing diagnosis codes of 1730 new, non-selected patient encountered were reviewed for a period of three years for the historical diagnosis of fibromyalgia. In the analysis, frequency of epileptic seizures, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and physiological non-epileptic events were comorbid with fibromyalgia was assessed. Results were evaluated using statistical methods. Wilcoxon test was used to analyze the interval data and Chi-square test was used to analyze the categorical data.

Out of 1730 patients, 95 patients were identified with fibromyalgia in which there were 95% females and 43% of those with fibromyalgia had a non-paroxysmal, neurological primary clinical diagnosis. Paroxysmal events were presented in 57% of fibromyalgia patients, among which 54% of cases matched the controls. In patients with fibromyalgia and paroxysmal disorders, 11% had epileptic seizures, 74% had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and 15% had physiological non-epileptic events, compared to case-matched controls with 37% epileptic seizures, 51% psychogenic non-epileptic events and 12% physiological non-epileptic events.

At the end, fibromyalgia has shown to be a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in patients with undifferentiated paroxysmal spells. However, results evaluated from the study suggested that the specificity and sensitivity of fibromyalgia as a marker for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in a mixed general neurological population of patients was less than previously described.

Epileptic Disorders
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