External Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation for the Acute Treatment of Migraine

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SCIENCE
External Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation for the Acute Treatment of Migraine
Key Take-Away: 

Pain reduction always becomes a challenging issue for patients suffering from migraine. Various acute and prophylactic treatment options are available for migraine treatment. This study emphasizes on trigeminal nerve stimulation therapy (TNS) and elucidates that TNS via a transcutaneous supraorbital stimulator appears to be an effective therapy for pain reduction in migraine patients.

The aim of the current study was to assess the safety and efficacy of external trigeminal nerve stimulation (e-TNS) via a transcutaneous supraorbital stimulator as an acute treatment for migraine attacks.

ABSTRACT: 
Background: 

The aim of the current study was to assess the safety and efficacy of external trigeminal nerve stimulation (e-TNS) via a transcutaneous supraorbital stimulator as an acut

The aim of the current study was to assess the safety and efficacy of external trigeminal nerve stimulation (e-TNS) via a transcutaneous supraorbital stimulator as an acute treatment for migraine attacks.

Methods: 

This was a prospective, open-labelled clinical trial conducted at the Columbia University Headache Center (NY, USA). Thirty patients who were experiencing an acute migraine attack with or without aura were treated with a one-hour session of e-TNS (CEFALY Technology) at the clinic.

Pain intensity was scored using a visual analogue scale (VAS) before the treatment, after the one-hour treatment session, and at two hours after treatment initiation. Rescue migraine medication intake was recorded at 2 and 24 hours.

Results: 

Thirty patients were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Mean pain intensity was significantly reduced by 57.1% after the one-hour e-TNS treatment (-3.22 ± 2.40; p < 0.001) and by 52.8% at two hours (-2.98 ± 2.31; p < 0.001).

No patients took rescue medication within the two-hour observation phase. Within the 24-hour follow-up, 34.6% of patients used a rescue medication. No adverse events or subjective complaints were reported.

Conclusion: 

The findings from this open-labelled study suggest that transcutaneous supraorbital neurostimulation may be a safe and effective acute treatment for migraine attacks, and merits further study with a double-blind, randomized, sham-controlled trial

Neuromodulation. 2017 Jun 5.
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