The cost-effectiveness of semi-rigid ankle brace to facilitate return to work following first-time acute ankle sprains

Primary tabs

SCIENCE
The cost-effectiveness of semi-rigid ankle brace to facilitate return to work following first-time acute ankle sprains
Key Take-Away: 

This is a decision model analysis which has proved, semi-rigid ankle brace to be efficacious and cost effective to expedite return to work in individuals with first-time ankle sprains. It has been compared to the conventional tapering method.

To examine the cost-effectiveness of semi-rigid ankle brace to facilitate return to work following first-time acute ankle sprains.

ABSTRACT: 
Background: 

To examine the cost-effectiveness of semi-rigid ankle brace to facilitate return to work following first-time acute ankle sprains.

Economic evaluation based on cost-utility analysis. Ankle sprains are a source of morbidity and absenteeism from work, accounting for 15-20% of all sports injuries. Semi-rigid ankle brace and taping are functional treatment interventions used by Musculoskeletal Physiotherapists and Nurses to facilitate return to work following acute ankle sprains.

Methods: 

A decision model analysis, based on cost-utility analysis from the perspective of National Health Service was used.

The primary outcomes measure was incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, based on quality-adjusted life years. Costs and quality of life data were derived from published literature, while model clinical probabilities were sourced from Musculoskeletal Physiotherapists.

Results: 

The cost and quality adjusted life years gained using semi-rigid ankle brace was £184 and 0.72 respectively.

However, the cost and quality adjusted life years gained following taping was £155 and 0.61 respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the semi-rigid brace was £263 per quality adjusted life year. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that ankle brace provided the highest net-benefit, hence the preferred option.

Conclusion: 

Taping is a cheaper intervention compared with ankle brace to facilitate return to work following first-time ankle sprains.

However, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio observed for ankle brace was less than the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence threshold and the intervention had a higher net-benefit, suggesting that it is a cost-effective intervention. Decision-makers may be willing to pay £263 for an additional gain in quality adjusted life year. The findings of this economic evaluation provide justification for the use of semi-rigid ankle brace by Musculoskeletal Physiotherapists and Nurses to facilitate return to work in individuals with first-time ankle sprains.

J Clin Nurs.2016 May 25;(9-10):1435-43

Comments

Log in or register to post comments