Brief intervention for medication-overuse headache in primary care. The BIMOH study: a double-blind pragmatic cluster randomised parallel controlled trial

Primary tabs

SCIENCE
Brief intervention for medication-overuse headache in primary care. The BIMOH study: a double-blind pragmatic cluster randomised parallel controlled trial
Key Take-Away: 

This research article has explained that gain from effective management of medication-overuse headache (MOH) in primary care may benefit the patients and society and may reduce the economic costs. It tells how brief intervention (BI) provides the general practitioners with a powerful, time efficient instrument for managing MOH. The treatment is behavioral, simple and inexpensive and has no side effects.

Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is common in the general population.

ABSTRACT: 
Background: 

Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is common in the general population. We investigated effectiveness of brief intervention (BI) for achieving drug withdrawal in primary care patients with MOH.

Methods: 

The study was double-blind, pragmatic and cluster-randomised controlled. A total of 25 486 patients (age 18–50) from 50 general practitioners (GPs) were screened for MOH. GPs defined clusters and were randomised to receive BI training (23 GPs) or to continue business as usual (BAU; 27 GPs). The Severity of Dependence Scale was applied as a part of the BI. BI involved feedback about individual risk of MOH and how to reduce overuse. Primary outcome measures were reduction in medication and headache days/month 3 months after the intervention and were assessed by a blinded clinical investigator.

Results: 

Total 42% responded to the postal screening questionnaire, and 2.4% screened positive for MOH. A random selection of up to three patients with MOH from each GP were invited (104 patients), 75 patients were randomised and 60 patients included into the study. BI was significantly better than BAU for the primary outcomes (p<0.001). Headache and medication days were reduced by 7.3 and 7.9 (95% CI 3.2 to 11.3 and 3.2 to 12.5) days/month in the BI compared with the BAU group. Chronic headache resolved in 50% of the BI and 6% of the BAU group.

Conclusion: 

The BI method provides GPs with a simple and effective instrument that reduces medication-overuse and headache frequency in patients with MOH.

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2015 May; 86(5):505-12

Comments

Log in or register to post comments