Botulinum Toxin Type A and Type B Prolong Lumbar Sympathetic Effect in Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

Primary tabs

NEWS
Botulinum Toxin Type A and Type B Prolong Lumbar Sympathetic Effect in Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

According to recent research published in "Toxins" Journal, the administration of either Botulinum Toxin Type A (BTA) or Type B (BTB) for Lumbar Sympathetic Block has been found to be the safe and effective method to lengthen the sympathetic blocking effect in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). The study also found BTB more efficacious than BTA in increasing the sympathetic blocking effect in CRPS patients.

CRPS is a chronic pain syndrome that causes sensory symptoms such as spontaneous pain and allodynia, as well as motor and autonomic nervous system symptoms. Lumbar sympathetic ganglion block (LSB) is a therapeutic method for CRPS affecting the lower limbs. Lately, LSB with BTA and BTB has been proposed as a unique method to produce a longer duration of analgesic effect.

In the present study, the BTA was compared with BTB in performing LSB on subjects with CRPS. Either BTA or BTB was used to perform LSB on patients with CRPS in their lower extremities. The time taken by the subjects to return to the pre-LSB pain score and the adverse effect of LSB with BTA/BTB were examined.

The median length of time used for the subjects to turn to the pre-LSB pain score was 15 days for the BTA group and 69 days for the BTB group (P = 0.002). A significant decrease in the scores on a visual analogue scale was noted in patients of both groups, and no notable adverse effects were observed.

Source:                       

Toxins

Link to the source:

http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6651/10/4/164/htm

The original title of the article:

Lumbar Sympathetic Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A and Type B for the Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

 

Authors

Lee; Y. et al.

SearchTags: 
Therapeutic, Botulinum toxin, Complex regional pain syndrome, Pain, Lower limbs, Chronic, Lumbar sympathetic ganglion block, Visual analogue scale
Log in or register to post comments