Association of Carotenoid Dietary Intake and Plasma Concentrations with Osteoporosis Heel Bone Ultrasound Attenuation and Osteoporotic Fracture Risk

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Association of Carotenoid Dietary Intake and Plasma Concentrations with Osteoporosis Heel Bone Ultrasound Attenuation and Osteoporotic Fracture Risk

According to the recent findings of the prospective study, the inclusion of carotenoids in the diet was found to be significantly beneficial for bone health in both men and women.

Osteoporosis is one of the most serious public health concerns affecting nearly 200 million people worldwide. Researchers are continually exploring new treatment options for adequate bone health recovery in patients with osteoporosis. Previous research studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of Carotenoids in bone health. The present study was conducted in the European population wit

h an aim to investigate the relationships of dietary carotenoid intakes and plasma concentrations with bone density status and osteoporotic fracture risk.

The data from the prospective European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Norfolk cohort of middle-aged and older men and women was included for cross-sectional analyses (n=14803) of bone density status, using calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and longitudinal analyses (n=25439) of fracture cases. The questionnaires about health and lifestyle were completed, and 7-d food diaries were used to acquire dietary nutrient intakes.

Multiple regression analysis revealed notable positive inclinations in BUA for women across quintiles of dietary α-carotene intake (P=0·029), β-carotene intake (P=0·003), β-cryptoxanthin intake (P=0·031), combined lutein and zeaxanthin intake (P=0·010) and lycopene intake (P=0·005). In women across quintiles of plasma carotenoid concentration, no considerable inclinations were noticed (n=4570). No trends in fracture risk across dietary carotenoid intake quintiles were discerned except for a lower risk of wrist fracture in women with higher lutein and zeaxanthin intake. Lower hip fracture risk in men across higher plasma α-carotene and β-carotene quintiles was reported during analysis of plasma carotenoid data.

Source:

Br J Nutr. 2017 Jun 7:1-15

Link to the source:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28587685

The original title of the article:

Carotenoid dietary intakes and plasma concentrations are associated with heel bone ultrasound attenuation and osteoporotic fracture risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Norfolk cohort.

Authors:

Hayhoe RPG et al.

SearchTags: 
Diagnostic, Carotenoids, Osteoporosis, Bones, Pigments, Prospective study
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