Assessment of characteristics for neuropathic pain after non-traumatic, non-compressive (NTNC) myelopathy

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Assessment of characteristics for neuropathic pain after non-traumatic, non-compressive (NTNC) myelopathy

Myelopathy arises when any neurologic deficit related to the spinal cord is observed. The work mentioned here was performed to estimate the characteristics of neuropathic pain after non-traumatic, non-compressive (NTNC) myelopathy and find potential predictors for neuropathic pain.

A total of 54 patients were considered with NTNC myelopathy. To evaluate pain, the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) and Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) was used. The Short Form 36-item (SF-36) health survey was used to assess the health-related QOL.

Total 16 (33.3%) out of 48 patients with pain experienced neuropathic pain. The mean age was remarkably lower in patients with neuropathic pain than with non-neuropathic pain (39.1 ± 12.5 vs. 49.8 ± 9.3, P = 0.002). Between two groups, there were no statistically significant differences in the other variables involving sex, etiology of myelopathy, pain and QOL scores. A binary logistic regression disclosed that onset age under 40, and non-idiopathic etiology were independent predictors of the existence of neuropathic pain. Both SF-MPQ and LANSS scores were efficiently correlated with SF-36 scores, adjusted as per age, sex, presence of diabetes mellitus, and current EDSS scores (r = –0.624, P < 0.0001 for SF-MPQ; r = –0.357, P = 0.017 for LANSS).

It can be said that neuropathic pain must be one of serious complications in patients with NTNC myelopathy and also influences their quality of life. For the development of neuropathic pain in NTNC myelopathy, onset age and etiology of myelopathy are the important factors.

The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine
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