Anesthetic and Analgesic short-stay programs for Knee Arthroplasty Management

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Anesthetic and Analgesic short-stay programs for Knee Arthroplasty Management

Total knee arthroplasty has been linked to severe postoperative pain which can limit the recovery and extend the length of stay in the hospital. However, due to surgery's financial pressures and stress on improving patient satisfaction, scientists focus on to design other outpatient and short-stay programs for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty.

Recently, Chris Cullo & Jonathan T. Weed conducted a review study to evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutic programs in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. The study revealed that the outpatient and short-stay programs comprise specific factors which help in making the procedure more beneficial than the traditional methods. One of the main factors involved was an effective perioperative anesthetic plan.  Perioperative anesthesia helps to enhance comfort & safety of patients during surgery. Further, for smoother & quicker postoperative course, improved technology & innovation played a significant role. These technologies provided more efficient strategies than the traditional ones. There was a significant reduction in post-operative pain due to peripheral nerve block usage in connection with a variety of systemic analgesics.  The adductor canal and IPACK blocks have emerged as a popular technique due to its considerable analgesic efficacy and muscle sparing properties.

The study provides sufficient evidence regarding the popularity of outpatient knee arthroplasty due to its advancements in surgical pathways. These advancements incorporate newer processes with an emphasis on multidisciplinary coordination.

Source:

Current Pain and Headache Reports

Link to the source:

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11916-017-0623-y

The original title of the article:

Anesthetic and Analgesic Management for Outpatient Knee Arthroplasty

Authors:

Chris Cullo & Jonathan T. Weed; et al.

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