Biomarkers for knee osteoarthritis progression

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Biomarkers for knee osteoarthritis progression

The onset of osteoarthritis begins from the middle age onwards causing pain and stiffness, especially in the hip, knee and thumb joints. It leads to the degeneration of joint cartilage and the underlying bone. This study was performed to learn about the alliance between changes in semi-quantitative knee MRI biomarkers over 24 months and radiographic and pain progression over 48 months in knees with mild to moderate osteoarthritis.

The investigators worked upon a nested case-control study as part of the Osteoarthritis Biomarkers Consortium Project. To determine the association between change over 24 months in semi-quantitative MR imaging markers, knee OA radiographic and pain progression, multivariable logistic regression models were assembled. The MRIs were studied according to the MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score (MOAKS) scoring system. They considered the changes in meniscus, cartilage, osteophytes, bone marrow lesions, Hoffa-synovitis and synovitis-effusion.

The most frugal model embraced changes in cartilage thickness and surface area, synovitis-effusion, Hoffa-synovitis, and meniscal morphology (C-statistic =0.740). For being a case, subjects with worsening cartilage thickness in 3+ subregions vs. no worsening had 2.8-fold (95% CI: 1.3 – 5.9) had greater odds. Also, subjects with worsening in cartilage surface area in 3+ subregions vs. no worsening had 2.4-fold (95% CI: 1.3 - 4.4) greater odds of being a case. Deterioration in synovitis-effusion (OR=2.7) and Hoffa-synovitis (OR=2.0) were also associated with greater odds of being a case.

The features associated with OA progression are 24 month change in cartilage thickness, cartilage surface area, synovitis-effusion, Hoffa-synovitis, and meniscal morphology. Thus, it was proposed that these may serve as efficacy biomarkers in clinical trials of disease modifying interventions for knee OA.

Arthritis Rheumatol.
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